How To Share Your Lightroom Ideas & Suggestions Directly With Adobe

Hi, gang:
I hear from a reasonable amount of folks who leave comments or send me messages asking me to share an idea or suggestion with Adobe for something they’d like to see added/changed/fixed/disabled/etc. in Lightroom Classic but you don’t need me to get your ideas heard. Adobe has a special forum just for you to share ideas directly with the team who monitor those forums daily.

Here’s the link. 🙂

Posting there is your best chance to be heard by the very people who can make it happen.

To increase the chances…
…of your idea or suggestion being considered by Adobe, when you post your idea I would recommend being nice. In fact, you should be nice always but especially when asking for someone to do something for you. That’s not an official Adobe thing, but it should be just an official “life” thing. 🙂

Are you in Atlanta? I am.
I’m up here today, but I’m teaching my full-day “Photoshop for Lightroom Users” seminar here tomorrow. Come on out and spend the day with me. Tickets and Info here. 

Call for Entries: You Could Win Your Own Solo Gallery Showing
The details are over on my blog today, but if you think you have no chance of winning — you’re in good company. Nobody that has won any of the competition even though they would win (and that’s in their own words). But they did do one important thing — they entered. Here’s the link for how to enter.

Hope I see you in Atlanta tomorrow (or Ft. Lauderdale next Monday). 🙂

Have a kick-butt Monday, and Roll Tide!

Best,

-Scott

 

The post How To Share Your Lightroom Ideas & Suggestions Directly With Adobe appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips .

Bekijk het origineel bericht

Six…No Wait…Seven Ways to Move Sliders in Lightroom Classic

One of these is probably going to make your life easier. Check out Benjamin Warde’s quick 60-second video on all seven:

Thanks, Benjamin.

Looking forward to seeing everybody in Atlanta today that’s here for my “Photoshop for Lightroom Users” seminar. Next stop — Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on Monday. Come on out and spend the day with me. 

Have a good one, everybody! 🙂

-Scott

The post Six…No Wait…Seven Ways to Move Sliders in Lightroom Classic appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips .

Bekijk het origineel bericht

Sizing Photos for Uploading Prints

I regularly get questions pertaining to image sizing in the context of making prints of a given dimension in inches. The conversion from pixel dimensions to a physical print at a given size has always been a confusing one. Let’s say you have a photo (or a series of photos) that you want to upload to some online print service for the purpose of making square prints of 8 inches x 8 inches (fill in whatever print size you prefer). The first decision you need to make to perform the conversion from pixel dimensions to inches is how many pixels do you want to print for every inch of print, which is more commonly referred to as how many pixels per inch or simply PPI.

The number that makes people absolutely jubilant when they hear “PPI” is 300. That’s not to say that you can’t print perfectly good looking images at a PPI (or resolution) value other than 300 PPI, but you can absolutely argue with people on the Internet about it all. day. long. 😀

Seriously though, for the most common print sizes (8 x 10 and smaller) our cameras these days have plenty of pixels in them to just stick to that magic 300 PPI resolution number, create beautiful prints, and avoid wasting hours in unnecessary arguments. So, if you know your pixel dimensions of your photo … wait, what’s that? You’re not sure of how to find a photo’s pixel dimensions in Lightroom? No worries, there’s a few ways to see it.

The first is here in Grid view. Just configure the Grid view style to display Cropped Dimensions in the cell border (here’s how ). It will look like this:

If you are in Loupe view, you can configure the Info Overlay to display Cropped Dimensions (here’s how ). That looks like this:

That even works in Develop’s Loupe view when you have the Crop Tool enabled, so you can see the pixel dimensions after you crop.

So, with my goal of producing a print that was 8 in x 8 in at 300 PPI, my next task would be to crop to a 1:1 (square) aspect ratio, and after doing so, my cropped dimensions change to reflect the crop.

My pixel dimensions for this photo went from 4032 pixels x 3024 pixels to 3024 pixels x 3024 pixels. That’s all fine and straightforward, but the place that makes us scratch our heads is figuring out the size of the print, right? This is where a little math comes in handy. Earlier I mentioned that we are talking about how many pixels per inch of print do we want use, which gives us a clue to the math involved. The formula looks like this:

Pixel dimension / Resolution (PPI) = dimension in inches

So if I plug in my numbers I get: 3024 pixels / 300 PPI = 10.08 inches

Even after my crop I’ve got more pixels than I need to achieve my goal of 8 x 8, and that’s just a photo from my phone. To finish the job of sizing this photo to precisely 8 in x 8 in at 300 PPI my next move would be to click the Export button and configure the Export dialog to achieve my output needs. In my case my needs are a JPG with sRGB color space resized to be my desired dimensions. The key panels on the Export dialog to achieve this are in the File Setting and Image Sizing panel as shown below.

Obviously you’d configure other panels to meet your needs, but those are the two panels that will achieve your desired file type, color space, and sizing for the print. You can even set the Post-Processing step of the Export dialog to open the exported copy into Photoshop, where you can confirm sizing is correct via the Image > Image Size dialog box.

So to review:

  • Choose your print size
  • Know your desired print resolution (stick to 300 PPI when in doubt)
  • Crop your photo to the desired print aspect ratio
  • Verify you have enough pixels with a tiny bit of math
  • Configure the Export dialog to save out copies at your desired specifications
  • (optional) Confirm size in Photoshop
  • Upload to be printed

The post Sizing Photos for Uploading Prints appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips .

Bekijk het origineel bericht

The Death of a Backup Photo Hard Drive

If you follow me here, or if you’ve watched my “Simplified Lightroom Image Management” (SLIM) System course (link ) at KelbyOne (or heard me teach it live at my Lightroom seminar), you’ve heard me going on and on about how you can’t rely on just one hard drive to back up your images. I talk about how important is that and that you not only have a have a backup of your backup BUT ALSO a cloud-backup, too! Well, this week, two people desperately needed their backups — for different reasons.

If you ever been to one of my seminars, you’ve seen Dave Gales; he’s my longtime friend and moderator for the seminar tour, and he does the morning announcements, helps out front, and bails me out if one of the projectors goes down and so much more. Anyway, we were in Atlanta on Tuesday for my seminar there and he was telling me how he had backed up his family photos to one hard drive, and all his videos to another drive. He did this backup about 18-months ago, but when he plugged the two drives in last week, BOTH were completely dead. Less than 18-months ago they were brand new drives. Now they’re bricks. Thankfully, we had a cloud backup (He’s been using Crash Plan, and though they’ve stopped doing backup for consumers, he was grandfathered in when they made the announcement, so he will still be able to use them for a couple of more years). Thankfully, he had that cloud backup, or he would have lost his entire family archive.

The week before, I got this email from one of my readers:

“By the way, I now put all my pictures on an external hard drive, got a second one and also took an annual backup license with Backblaze which you recommend in the book. It was a wonderful tip, as my laptop was stolen recently and I could recover all my files. Thank you so much for the tip!!!”

Well, I’m passing this same tip on to you today. Yes, you should absolutely have a backup drive for your backup drive, but having a Cloud backup (I use Backblaze.com – $5 a month unlimited storage) where they automatically provide redundant backups for you, could be the key to saving you from the heartbreaking of losing your entire image library.

This would be a great weekend to set your three-level backup strategy in place.
You can watch my new 2018 SLIM System online course for more on all this backup stuff. Here’s the official trailer (below), and a link to the course itself is here.

Have a great weekend everybody — I’m off to shoot the Dolphins game this weekend, and then on Monday I’m doing my last seminar for the year — it’s my “Photoshop for Lightroom Users”full-day seminar – this time in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Hope you can come out and spend the day with me. Tickets and info here.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Check out this crazy deal — yesterday Dave texted me about a deal he found on B&H on a 10-Terabyte WD External Hard Drive for just $199 (that’s TEN – count ’em ‚ 10-Terabytes for $199 ($100 off). Here’s the link in case you need one. 

The post The Death of a Backup Photo Hard Drive appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips .

Bekijk het origineel bericht

Xiaomi’s new AI fixes image exposure and detail in low-quality photos

Chinese company Xiaomi is working on an algorithm that will improve low-quality images. The company wants to compete with Apple regarding smartphone photography, and it has just published a new paper on the AI network called “DeepExposure.” It uses machine learning to improve low-quality images by adding them detail while enhancing colors and brightness. The […]

The post Xiaomi’s new AI fixes image exposure and detail in low-quality photos appeared first on DIY Photography .

This trippy video was made by strapping an LED onto a drone

As drones are becoming more accessible and popular, creatives keep finding new ways to incorporate them into their work. Film director and photographer Oliver Astrologo experimented with an LED light and a drone to create a trippy, captivating video. View this post on Instagram I love to experiment technologies to come up with new video […]

The post This trippy video was made by strapping an LED onto a drone appeared first on DIY Photography .

Abstract aerial photos show beauty of the Earth shaped by water

Water makes up the majority of the Earth, shaping the planet and its life in plenty of ways. When seen from above, waterways can create stunning images that tell stories of our home planet. Water.Shapes.Earth is a project by photographer Milan Radisics which turns the meandering waterways all over the world into amazing abstract images. […]

The post Abstract aerial photos show beauty of the Earth shaped by water appeared first on DIY Photography .

4 easy ways to set up great lighting for vlogs and video conferences

If you want people to take you seriously, whether it’s in a vlog or a simple video conference with a colleague or client, you need to have good lighting. As photographers or filmmakers we’re supposed to know this stuff. So, having bad lighting on ourselves doesn’t really set a great impression. In this video, Jay […]

The post 4 easy ways to set up great lighting for vlogs and video conferences appeared first on DIY Photography .

Luminar 3 comes with the “Libraries” digital asset management system and batch editing

It’s been a long time coming, but Luminar 3 has officially been announced today. It ships out on December 18th and it comes with Libraries – that’s the name for their new digital asset management system. Luminar 3 is a major overhaul of the software and now allows you to organise and edit multiple images […]

The post Luminar 3 comes with the “Libraries” digital asset management system and batch editing appeared first on DIY Photography .